When is measuring SDGs like counting crested newts? OPM speaking at Royal Statistical Society event
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October 2017

Researchers and evaluators working in development are highly dependent on household surveys. However many of the most excluded populations - such as street children, the disabled, or conflict victims- are either outside households altogether or so sparsely distributed that they are hard to capture with standard techniques. These data gaps are becoming increasingly critical as we contemplate the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) challenge to ‘leave no one behind’ and the importance of semi-formal institutions like small private schools and community groups becomes is ever more obvious.

Statisticians working on ecological and zoological issues have long faced analogous problems, and have developed an extensive theoretical and applied literature to deal with them which has potential applications in development. On 31 October 2017, 6-8pm, the Royal Statistical Society is holding a meeting at their London headquarters in Errol Street, designed to promote discussion between ecological statisticians and development practitioners addressing hard to measure issues.

OPM will be represented by Cora Mezger on the topic of unregistered and mobile populations and the SDGs, Fred Merttens speaking about the difficulties of evaluating cash transfers for pastoral nomads in Kenya, and Matthew Powell speaking about the problems of capturing private schools in Nigeria. The meeting will also be addressed by Heather Worthington of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at St Andrews who will talk about the theory of measuring populations without a frame, applications to measuring drug addiction in Glasgow, and Great Crested Newts!

More information about the event, including registration, can be found at the Royal Statistical Society website.

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When is measuring SDGs like counting crested newts? OPM speaking at Royal Statistical Society event

October 2017

Researchers and evaluators working in development are highly dependent on household surveys. However many of the most excluded populations - such as street children, the disabled, or conflict victims- are either outside households altogether or so sparsely distributed that they are hard to capture with standard techniques. These data gaps are becoming increasingly critical as we contemplate the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) challenge to ‘leave no one behind’ and the importance of semi-formal institutions like small private schools and community groups becomes is ever more obvious.

Statisticians working on ecological and zoological issues have long faced analogous problems, and have developed an extensive theoretical and applied literature to deal with them which has potential applications in development. On 31 October 2017, 6-8pm, the Royal Statistical Society is holding a meeting at their London headquarters in Errol Street, designed to promote discussion between ecological statisticians and development practitioners addressing hard to measure issues.

OPM will be represented by Cora Mezger on the topic of unregistered and mobile populations and the SDGs, Fred Merttens speaking about the difficulties of evaluating cash transfers for pastoral nomads in Kenya, and Matthew Powell speaking about the problems of capturing private schools in Nigeria. The meeting will also be addressed by Heather Worthington of the School of Mathematics and Statistics at St Andrews who will talk about the theory of measuring populations without a frame, applications to measuring drug addiction in Glasgow, and Great Crested Newts!

More information about the event, including registration, can be found at the Royal Statistical Society website.