OPM evaluation recognised by UK Department for International Development
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July 2016

An evaluation of the Free Health Care Initiative (FHCI) in Sierra Leone has been described as a ‘how to’ for complex evaluations by senior health officials at the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID).

In partnership with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and DFID, the Oxford Policy Management team carried out an independent evaluation of the country’s flagship maternity and neo-natal health programme. Our findings – which indicate that the FHCI was a clear contributor to increased coverage and greater equity of health care provision – were presented to senior officials at Whitehall last week.

Our team developed a theory of change to map out how the FHCI might produce impact, and gathered data over a two year period. We also produced a number of projections of need and resource, based on different scenarios to help identify different funding options for maintaining and scaling-up the initiative in the future.

Nouria Brikci, senior consultant at OPM and project manager of the evaluation, said:
We’re delighted to have received such good feedback from the funder of the overall programme. We felt the evaluation was thorough, fair and produced reliable findings, but it’s great to have that externally verified. We look forward to taking what we learned from this project into our future evaluation work.

Our evaluation was presented to DFID officials in July, and at their request will now be presented to DFID’s evaluation community later in the year.

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OPM evaluation recognised by UK Department for International Development

July 2016

An evaluation of the Free Health Care Initiative (FHCI) in Sierra Leone has been described as a ‘how to’ for complex evaluations by senior health officials at the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID).

In partnership with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and DFID, the Oxford Policy Management team carried out an independent evaluation of the country’s flagship maternity and neo-natal health programme. Our findings – which indicate that the FHCI was a clear contributor to increased coverage and greater equity of health care provision – were presented to senior officials at Whitehall last week.

Our team developed a theory of change to map out how the FHCI might produce impact, and gathered data over a two year period. We also produced a number of projections of need and resource, based on different scenarios to help identify different funding options for maintaining and scaling-up the initiative in the future.

Nouria Brikci, senior consultant at OPM and project manager of the evaluation, said:
We’re delighted to have received such good feedback from the funder of the overall programme. We felt the evaluation was thorough, fair and produced reliable findings, but it’s great to have that externally verified. We look forward to taking what we learned from this project into our future evaluation work.

Our evaluation was presented to DFID officials in July, and at their request will now be presented to DFID’s evaluation community later in the year.