New global research programme hosts policy workshop in Tanzania
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July 2016

Policymakers, academics, researchers and private sector stakeholders gathered in Dar es Salaam today to discuss a critical question for development: how does, and could, energy drive economic growth in low-income countries?

Focusing on the challenges and opportunities faced by the East Africa region, the high-level policy workshop included keynote speeches from the Permanent Secretary of Tanzania’s Minister of Energy and Minerals - Professor Justin Ntalikwa - and EEG Research Director, Professor Catherine Wolfram. There were numerous contributions from leading public and private sector figures from Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia and Kenya. Three panel sessions stimulated dialogue around the topics of energy access and supply; meeting energy demand; and technologies for increasing grid performance and improved sector planning. Within these themes, panellists and audience members highlighted a wide range of key themes from gender to political economy, tariffs to technologies, and the differences between rural and urban contexts.

Attended by more than sixty delegates, the workshop marks the start of a series of policy engagement forums under the new global research programme, Energy and Economic Growth (EEG). Funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) and managed by Oxford Policy Management in partnership with the Center for Effective Global Action at the University of California, Berkeley, the five-year programme aims to fill the evidence gap around the links between energy and economic growth in South Asian and Sub-Saharan African countries. 

At the heart of the programme is a commitment to ensuring the real-world policy relevance of research by promoting meaningful dialogue and partnerships between policymakers and academics. Policy workshops are a key means of enabling this dialogue to take place. A second workshop is scheduled to take place in Nepal later this year. 

OPM Senior Consultant and EEG Deputy Programme Director Marcela Tarazona said: ‘It’s fantastic to bring together these diverse voices, all of whom are working to bring about change in the energy sector in East Africa, to share their insights, and help us to ensure that the programme’s research agenda speaks directly to the needs of policymakers and others working to effect change in the energy sector- and, therefore, ultimately, has a real impact on people’s lives.’

The policy engagement activities will be complemented by a set of ‘State of Knowledge’ papers on six key thematic areas, produced by some of the world’s leading academics. Together, these activities will help to define the research framework and priority areas for Part two of the programme beginning next year. 

Follow the EEG programme here: 
Energy for Economic Growth

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New global research programme hosts policy workshop in Tanzania

July 2016

Policymakers, academics, researchers and private sector stakeholders gathered in Dar es Salaam today to discuss a critical question for development: how does, and could, energy drive economic growth in low-income countries?

Focusing on the challenges and opportunities faced by the East Africa region, the high-level policy workshop included keynote speeches from the Permanent Secretary of Tanzania’s Minister of Energy and Minerals - Professor Justin Ntalikwa - and EEG Research Director, Professor Catherine Wolfram. There were numerous contributions from leading public and private sector figures from Tanzania, Uganda, Ethiopia and Kenya. Three panel sessions stimulated dialogue around the topics of energy access and supply; meeting energy demand; and technologies for increasing grid performance and improved sector planning. Within these themes, panellists and audience members highlighted a wide range of key themes from gender to political economy, tariffs to technologies, and the differences between rural and urban contexts.

Attended by more than sixty delegates, the workshop marks the start of a series of policy engagement forums under the new global research programme, Energy and Economic Growth (EEG). Funded by the UK’s Department for International Development (DFID) and managed by Oxford Policy Management in partnership with the Center for Effective Global Action at the University of California, Berkeley, the five-year programme aims to fill the evidence gap around the links between energy and economic growth in South Asian and Sub-Saharan African countries. 

At the heart of the programme is a commitment to ensuring the real-world policy relevance of research by promoting meaningful dialogue and partnerships between policymakers and academics. Policy workshops are a key means of enabling this dialogue to take place. A second workshop is scheduled to take place in Nepal later this year. 

OPM Senior Consultant and EEG Deputy Programme Director Marcela Tarazona said: ‘It’s fantastic to bring together these diverse voices, all of whom are working to bring about change in the energy sector in East Africa, to share their insights, and help us to ensure that the programme’s research agenda speaks directly to the needs of policymakers and others working to effect change in the energy sector- and, therefore, ultimately, has a real impact on people’s lives.’

The policy engagement activities will be complemented by a set of ‘State of Knowledge’ papers on six key thematic areas, produced by some of the world’s leading academics. Together, these activities will help to define the research framework and priority areas for Part two of the programme beginning next year. 

Follow the EEG programme here: 
Energy for Economic Growth